Categories
Nature Sports

This is the biggest wave ever surfed

Nature always makes you feel small.

Brazilian surfer Rodrigo Koxa surfed a record-setting 80-foot wave in November 2017 off the coast of Nazaré, Portugal. The 38-year-old is the official world record-holder for riding the biggest wave ever.

Just look at the lighthouse and onlookers in perspective to the surfer surrounded by the mountainous wave, or shall we say avalanche.

Watch it for yourself.

World Record: This is the biggest wave ever surfed
World Record: This is the biggest wave ever surfed
World Record: This is the biggest wave ever surfed Rodrigo Koxa
Brazilian surfer Rodrigo Koxa
Categories
Architecture & Design Nature

Waves in progress

Waves in progress
Gif by 00.032

Here’s something you can look at for hours: looping waves in progress.

Created using visual effect software Houdini by Polish motion designer who goes by the name 00.032, according to her dribble page, the piece takes after Matthieu Lehanneur’s original physical work of the same vein.

The French designer Lehanneur constructed a furniture collection called Ocean Memories that depicts three-dimensional ocean currents frozen into stone and bronze sculptures.

Lehanneur and 00.032 demonstrate both static and motion-centric representations of the Earth’s ocean.

Waves, a symbol of natural energy, have been a fascination with artists such as Hokusai for centuries.

Categories
Culture & Society Nature Travel

Born to dive: The Bajau sea nomads spend 60% of their day underwater

The Bajau sea nomads

The Bajau sea nomads are people from the Malay Archipelago (Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia).

Aquatic life is literally in their DNA. According to a study from the journal Cell:

They are renowned for their extraordinary abilities, diving to depths of over 70 m with nothing more than a set of weights and a pair of wooden goggles (Schagatay, 2014) and spending 60% of their daily working time underwater (Schagatay et al., 2011).

They’ve evolved to harbor extreme breath-holding capabilities with up to 13 minutes underwater. For thousands of years, the Bajau people have developed expanded spleens due to their dependency on diving underwater for food.

No one knows what originally compelled the Bajau to dive other than their need to survive and feed entire families.

Without experimentation, evolution does not exist. It is through struggle and adaptation we evolve.

Learn more in the video below.

Categories
Nature

The Octopus in my house

BBC Earth is back with another excellent special, this time focusing on the intriguing creature of the octopus.

Octopuses are intelligent, with nine brains, half a billion neurons in their arms, and three hearts. They can also adapt to different colors and textures in camouflaging with their surroundings. Check out the rainbow octopus!

Alien-like, it is also believed that octopuses have a consciousness.

From the BBC’s show notes:

A professor develops an extraordinary relationship with an octopus when he invites it to live in his home. The octopus, called Heidi, unravels puzzles, recognises individual humans and even watches TV with the family.

The episode also shows remarkable behaviour from around the world – from the day octopus, which can change colour and texture in a split second, to the coconut octopus, which carries around its own coconut shell to hide in. But most fascinating of all is seeing how Professor David Scheel and his daughter Laurel bond with an animal that has nine brains, three hearts and blue blood running through its veins.

Categories
Nature

The world’s first underwater hotel

The Muraka hotel in the Maldives is the world's first underwater hotel in the world. 

LEARN MORE #travel #hotel #ocean

The Muraka hotel in the Maldives is the world’s first underwater hotel in the world.

With two-story rooms submerged 16 feet below sea-level in the Indian ocean, the residency also boasts an incredible price point: $50,000 per night!

According to Archpaper, the villas were constructed with the latest technology:

The construction of The Muraka was both innovative and environmentally-conscious. Each piece of the modular structure was built in Singapore and then carefully shipped to the Maldives, before being plunged underwater and nailed into place using thick, concrete pylons. The sturdy pylons ensure that the villa does not shift or downright float away in the midst of high tides or rough waves.

Personally, I think most of us are better off going to the aquarium for the day rather than sleeping with the fishes. You can see more images of the hotel right here.

Categories
Nature

Rare ‘rainbow’ blanket octopus

Take a look at this video of these ultra-rare trippy rainbow blanket octopuses caught on camera off the coast of Romblon, Philippines.

Coincidentally, they arrive just in time for Pride month.

It’s no wonder these intelligent alien-looking creatures have “half a billion neurons, about as many as a dog.” And most of those neurons are in their arms. They may even have a consciousness.