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Nature Science

The beauty of Iceland’s Vestrahorn mountain

Vestrahorn mountain in south-east Iceland is one to behold.

Nicknamed “Batman Mountain” for its awe-inspiring beauty, the 1490 foot mountain looks down at the flat black sand of Stokksnes Beach below.

Known for its spiky peaks that resemble the horns on a bull, Vestrahorn is composed of both gabbro and granophyre rocks. But in order to access the photogenic landscape of the mountain beach, you’ll need to make a small payment to the landowner first.

By the looks of it, the experience is worth every penny.

Iceland’s Vestrahorn mountain
via Dede/Twitter
Iceland’s Vestrahorn mountain
via Sigfrido/tw
Iceland’s Vestrahorn mountain
via Sigfrido/tw
Iceland’s Vestrahorn mountain
via Sigfrido/tw

Categories
Animals Nature Science

Venice, Italy from space before and after coronavirus lockdown

Once the epicenter of the Coronavirus, Italy has seen its popular cities like Venice deserted.

Check out these before and after photos of Venice from space prior to the lockdown caused by the pandemic.

Venice, Italy from space before and after coronavirus lockdown

The people’s pollution?

Human absence is having an environmental impact on the city.

Dolphins are purportedly swimming through the city’s canals and the swans have returned.

One can see also little fish swimming in clear waters, also an unexpected side effect of the pandemic.

Categories
Nature Science

Rare Hominin skull excavated in Ethiopia

Paleontologists have discovered a 3.8 million-year-old skull in Woranso-Mille, Ethiopia that reveals the face of a male Australopithecus anamensis.

The newfound hominin cranium provides new information about our earliest ancestors.

Rare Hominin skull excavated in Ethiopia
Rare Hominin skull excavated in Ethiopia

Hominin bones before Lucy, the 3.2m-year-old iconic skeleton, previously served as a missing link in explaining the human evolutionary tree.

The leading scientist of the study, Yohannes Haile-Selassie, describes the unearthed skull a “game changer in our understanding of human evolution”.

The precious discovery of the Australopithecine as reported via Nature now represents the face of our oldest direct ancestor.

Yohannes Haile-Selassie with the complete skull of Australopithecus anamensis
Yohannes Haile-Selassie with the complete skull of Australopithecus anamensis
Rare Hominin skull excavated in Ethiopia
Rare Hominin skull excavated in Ethiopia
Rare Hominin skull excavated in Ethiopia
Categories
Science

Watch a soap bubble freeze

Did you know that you can blow up soap bubbles and instantly freeze them into ice orbs?

If you’re searching for a fun cold-weather activity, this is worth trying out.

Popular Science explains the science behind bubble freeze, in addition to instructions on how to make one.

There’s some interesting science at play here. Every bubble is made up of three individual layers: a thin layer of water molecules squished between two layers of soap. It might look like the entire surface of the bubble is freezing, but what you’re actually seeing is the innermost layer of water—which freezes at warmer temperatures than soapy water—turning to ice within the film.

As the soapy water turns into ice crystals, the inside of the bubble appears to swirl around to create a beautiful effect of a snowglobe — very photographic!

But the ice bubbles don’t last forever, notes bubble photographer Chris Ratzlaff: “Bubbles are such ephemeral things,” he says. “To be able to literally freeze them in time is such a rare experience.”

Enjoy some more bubble freezing videos below:

Watch a soap bubble freeze
via twitter
via Nan Walton/tw
Categories
Science Technology

MesoSPIMs: Custom-built microscopes that can scan individual neurons in the brain

MesoSPIMs are open-source light-sheet microscopes for imaging cleared tissue.

The custom-built microscopes enable scientists to look at individual neurons using sheets of light rather than cutting a brain into slices.

A chicken embryo captured under the mesoSPIM microscope

The mesoSPIM Initiative paves the way for the future discovery and understanding of the brain’s complex organization. The studies may one day reveal vital information on the neuronal networks that drive mental illnesses and addictions.

Categories
Architecture & Design Science Technology

Watch styrofoam dancing to sound waves

Put your hands in the air and wave them like you just don’t care.

What looks like a dubstep rave of little ghost people is actually styrofoam dancing to sound waves in a massive plexiglass pipe known as a Kundt’s tube.

In 1866 German physicist August Kundt constructed the apparatus to measure the speed of sound in a gas or a solid rod.

The faux mosh pit is the result of a process called sound looking which demonstrates what audible vibrations may actually look like.

No one can doubt that life moves to fascinating rhythms & vibrations.

Watch the entire video below.