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Animals Nature

Watch a dancing dragonfly up close

Take a look at this fascinating video of a dragonfly up close, seemingly smiling, dabbing, and posing with human-like expressions in front of the camera.

Is it doing the Macarena, doing the YMCA, or dancing to Madonna’s song ‘Vogue?’

They dance while they’re young

Dragonflies have been around nearly 300 million years and can reach speeds up to 31mph when in flight. But once the dragonfly larvae propel off the water and into the air it only lives for about a month.

If any of the 5,000 species of dragonflies land on your head, the theory goes, count yourself lucky.

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Animals Nature Science

It’s ‘Raining’ Iguanas in South Florida

Iguanas in South Florida are falling out of trees due to freezing temperatures.

Weather in South Florida dropped into the 30s on Tuesday night, which immobilized the iguanas and turned their bodies dormant.

“Don’t be surprised if you see iguanas falling from the trees tonight,” the Miami National Weather Service office tweeted.

The good news is that the iguanas woke up when the heat turned back up on Wednesday morning, like this one. While Miami suffered its coldest temperatures in 9 years, it’s expected to be back to 80 on Friday.

It’s ‘Raining’ Iguanas in South Florida
via Twitter
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Animals Science

Anthropologist Grover Krantz donated his body to science with this one condition

Grover Krantz was one of the few anthropologists who dedicated their time to studying Sasquatch, aka Bigfoot.

As a cryptozoologist, Krantz believed that Bigfoot might exist and did everything he could to research it. Five of his ten books explored the possible existence of the ape-like creature.

Perhaps even more interestingly, the peculiar scientist donated his body to science with the one condition that his dog Clyde, an Irish wolfhound, would be right by him.

“I’ve been a teacher all my life and I think I might as well be a teacher after I’m dead, so why don’t I just give you my body,” said Krantz. “But there’s one catch: You have to keep my dogs with me.”

Both Krantz and Clyde are on display at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington DC.

PS, if you’re wondering why mentions of Bigfoot may be on the decline, blame technology.

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Animals Nature

Watch two Kangaroos fight it all out in the Australia Outback

What looks like it was taken out of a country western film, here are two Kangaroos fighting each other from the outback in Australia.

Kangaroos usually loaf around most of the time — if they’re not eating or jumping around — so to see them duking it out like humans in a good old boxing match is fascinating.

For all the jokes about humans fighting kangaroos, it seems unlikely that humans could defend against the extremely muscular hind legs of these marsupial kickboxers — their kicks are so lethal they can crush bones!

Watch two Kangaroos fight it all out in the Australia Outback
via Twitter
via Twitter
Watch two Kangaroos fight it all out in the Australia Outback

But in more serious terms, if you want to donate to help fight the rampant Australia fires — of which millions of wild animals have been a victim, including kangaroos — donate here.

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Animals Nature Science

Studying woodpeckers is helping prevent brain trauma

“When you’re hit on the football field, parts of your brain may fizz like a just-opened can of soda.”

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“When you’re hit on the football field, parts of your brain may fizz like a just-opened can of soda.”

The brain released humans from the prison of biology.
So why do we do anything that damages our ability to think? Because of sports like football that entertain.

However, a new technology designed to mimic a woodpecker’s shock-absorbing beak may prevent football players from brain injury.

“It likely clinched its jugular vein with its long omohyoid muscle, protecting against brain slosh by filling its brain with blood.”

Scientists first theorized that increasing blood to the brain would help safeguard the head against collisions. Existing data revealed that playing football at higher altitudes generated fewer concussions. However, scientist Joseph Fisher thought he could still protect players’ brains without suffocating their oxygen. He went back to study the physiology of the woodpecker’s distinctive “omohyoid solution” for battling head trauma.

“forget CO2, Fisher thought. All you needed was to press lightly on the neck. Fisher bought a pair of headphones at an electronics store, bent the metal band a little, and placed them around his neck with the pads against his jugular veins.”

Naturally, scientists tested the hypothesis on rats by putting a neckband on them and forcing collisions. The neck-protected rats saw an “83 percent reduction in brain damage compared to rats that didn’t.” Scientists got approval to test a neck collar on high school football players.

“The kids who had worn the collar, on the other hand, saw significantly fewer changes. Their brains hadn’t suffered the same way. The findings were also replicated in hockey players. What worked for woodpeckers seemed to work for humans. A little extra blood in the skull swaddled the brain enough to reduce damage.”

In other words, squeezing the jugular sends just enough blood to the head to prevent brain injury and in the long-run, dementia caused by CTE. Astonishing, right? It makes you think why the NFL does not have an R&D department. The worst-case scenario? Figure out how to play American football using bubbles.

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Animals Nature

Lollimeow Pet Carrier: A backpack that allows you to take your kitty anywhere

Ever wanted to take your kitty for a long walk through nature?

This pet carrier breathable backpack made by Lollimeow allows owners to take their fellow felines wherever the human wants to go.

The bag contains a bubble window for hiking with 9 large ventilation holes on both sides and the front.

A backpack that allows you to take your kitty anywhere

It’s time to let the cat out of the bag

There are obvious space and safety issues with the bag. Imagine using this on a hot day, not to mention potential bathroom mishaps.

Some folks might prefer to take their cats for a walk on a leash or in a stroller.

Of course, the ideal scenario for any curious cat is freedom from the tyranny of indoors.

All in all, the backpack may come most handy as a convenient go-to traveler for short trips to the vet. But it’s also airline approved!

Use wisely.

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Animals

How alligators freeze this time of year

With the polar vortex sweeping the Midwest and other parts of the nation, there are some animals like alligators that welcome the freeze.

Crocodiles in North Carolina take in winter by letting their body freeze while allowing their nostrils to hang out in the air.

The survival mechanism is called brumation, where there the reptile hibernates underwater for a few days at a time to lowers its body heat and metabolism. Peep the video after the jump.

Categories
Animals Nature

The dead leaf butterfly

Known as the Kallima inachus, or dead leaf butterfly, the insect resembles the veins of a dry leaf when it’s in the closed position. This type of butterfly is prevalent from Southeast Asia to Japan.

The upper side of the dead leaf butterfly is beautifully colored, with yellow and dark blue and blue patterns. Check out the two videos after the jump including the video of the dragontail butterfly.