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Animals Travel

A rare look at a white owl swimming through a canyon

Behold this rare video of a white owl or snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus), swimming through a canyon in Lake Powell.

While snowy owls are native to Arctic regions in North America and Eurasia, they can be seen in Utah and Arizona, where Lake Powell resides.

A mythical animal, the white owl looks even more elegant in this rare scene of it treading water.

Video courtesy Derrick Zuk

Categories
Animals Nature

Pink sea urchins have self-sharpening teeth

Pink sea urchins house five teeth, each supported by a separate jaw in a circular arrangement at the center of their spiked spherical bodies.

But researchers at Northwestern have discovered that the teeth of pink sea urches are specially equipped to self-sharpen themselves.

The enamel break bits off regularly to maintain sharpness, the same way a knife sharpens upon a blade.

“The material on the outer layer of the tooth exhibits a complex behavior of plasticity and damage that regulates ‘controlled’ chipping of the tooth to maintain its sharpness,” said Northwestern University Professor Horacio Espinosa.

The teeth continue to grow throughout life, helping the sea urchins ward off predators.

Graphic via cell.com
Categories
Culture & Society Nature

Oxygen in the house: Barcelona opera house reopens with performance to over 2,000 plants

No, this is not an article from The Onion.

To mark Spain’s lifting of lockdown restrictions, Barcelona’s Liceu Opera House reopened for the first time in three months with a performance to 2,292 potted plants.

The three classical musicians performed Puccini’s “Crisantemi” to “reaffirm the value of art, music and nature” after Covid-19 lockdowns.

Even more, the plants will be donated to the city’s healthcare workers.

You love to see it! Watch the full performance below.

Categories
Animals

How your wealth attracts more insects

A recent study links higher income to the diversity of bugs inside homes. Called the ‘luxury effect,’ wealthier people tend to have more bug types hanging out indoors.

This may not seem obvious at first, but the reason is simple. The richer you are, the more likely you are to own a bigger house and maintain a landscape, which supports more plants and trees, which cultivates more bugs, thereby inviting more types of insects into your home.

“More expensive houses tend to be larger, providing more space for bugs to roam. This is called the species-area curve, a concept originally  developed to help explain diversity in oceanic islands. The concept soon expanded to include diversity of all stripes. Basically, the more area there is, the more species can call a place home.”

The study also suggests that bugs treat the larger homes like they do trees, living in different rooms like they do on tree branches.

So, just imagine the diversity of insects bug lovers would discover at the White House, Lebron’s mansion, or your resort. But if you live in a city? You can throw the insect to income ratio out the window.

Categories
Nature Travel

Abandoned ‘Into the Wild’ Bus Hoisted From Alaskan Wilderness

The Alaska National Guard airlifted the abandoned bus from 2007 classic Into the Wild due to public safety concerns.

Located on the Stampede Trail near Alaska’s Denali National Park in Healy, Alaska, the Fairbanks Bus 142 attracted hikers from around the world trying to reach it.

Some hikers even drowned in the attempt. The state issued 15 search and rescue operations between 2009 and 2017.

The film was an adaptation of the 1996 non-fiction book Into the Wild which tells the story of American hiker Christopher McCandless. He traveled across North American before winding up in the Alaskan wilderness in the early 1990s.

McCandless lived in the bus until starving to death in 1992 after spending 114 days there.

via Alaska National Guard