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Animals Nature

The fabulous bowl haircut of the Gloster Corona Canary

It looks like someone is having a bad hair day.

The Gloster Corona Crested Canary sports a bowl haircut — often referred to as ‘crests’ — made famous by Ringo and the Three Stooges.

The chubby and cute wig-wearing little bird also dons a dynamic singing voice, much louder to other groups in the canary breed.

As a result of the Gloster Canary’s unique style and charming vocals, the creature has become a popular cage bird. The birds come in both yellow, green, and brown color variations.

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Nature Travel

The Rock: Urup Island, Russia

Here’s the last island you’d ever want to be stranded on. 

This uninhabited volcanic rock formation is part of a 552 square mile Russian island called Urup, which means ‘salmon trout’ in Ainu. 

Urup island sits south of the Kuril Islands chain in the Sea of Okhotsk in the northwest Pacific Ocean. 

One can imagine this upstanding volcanic plug off the coast of Urup appearing in a future James Bond film. 

Photo: Twitter/travelfoxcom
The Rock: Urup Island, Russia
Photo: Twitter/travelfoxcom
The Rock: Urup Island, Russia
Photo: Twitter/amitripstravel

According to the Neatline antique map collection website, Urup used to be known as “Company’s Land” as discovered by Maarten Vries of Dutch East India Company in 1643. Vries map (see below) is considered the westernmost region of America, a widely held view in the 17th and 18th centuries. 

The Rock: Urup Island, Russia
Photo: Twitter/Neatlinemaps
Categories
Nature

Hooker’s Lips: The world’s most kissable flower

The tropical plant Psychotria Elata aka ‘Hooker’s Lips’ is Latin America’s most kissable flower.

Native to Colombia, Costa Rica, and Panama, the flower’s enchanting red bracts mimic that of a woman’s luscious lips.

The plant has evolved its big red shape to pucker up and attract pollinators like butterflies and hummingbirds. White flowers emerge from the plant’s smoochy center between December and March.

Sadly, deforestation and climate change are wiping the species of the Earth. People in Central America are also known to exchange the plant during Valentine’s Day — go figure!

Photo: Twitter/qikipedia
Photo: Twitter/natureisweird
Photo: Mabelin Santos from Getty Images via Canva Pro
Photo: corridor91 from Getty Images via Canva Pro
Categories
Animals Nature

Lost and Found: The Somali Elephant Shrew is back!

The Somali Sengi, also known as the Somali Elephant Shrew, is back after a 50-year hiatus. The small insectivorous mammal endemic to Somalia was deemed extinct since the 1970s by the Global Wildlife Conservation’s list of lost species. 

But scientists recently rediscovered a thriving population of Somali Sengi in Djibouti. 

“Here we report new evidence that the Somali Sengi is currently extant,” says the study.

“These data include voucher specimens, georeferenced occurrence localities, body measurements, habitat parameters, and DNA sequences. While the species is historically documented as endemic to Somalia, these new records are from the neighboring Republic of Djibouti and thus expand the Somali Sengi’s known range in the Horn of Africa.”

The adorable mouse-sized creature features a long snout that allows it to suck up ants into its trunk-like nose. The animal is also known to pick up speeds of 19 miles per hour. 

The shrew is neither elephant nor shrew, to be exact, but a distant relative to aardvarks, hyraxes, and manatees.  

Lost for half a century and found, let’s hope we never lose sight of the adorable Somali Sengi again.  

Lost and Found: The Somali Elephant Shrew is back!
Photo: pum_eva from Getty Images via Canva Pro
Lost and Found: The Somali Elephant Shrew is back!
Photo: Courtesy of Steven Heritage
Categories
Nature Technology Travel

The rise and tragic death of Sweden’s Broccoli Tree

“In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes,” said Andy Warhol. That was certainly true for the “broccoli tree” in Sweden.

In March 2018, the once anonymous broccoli-shaped tree on the shoe of Sweden’s Lake Vättern disappeared due to the popularity of its Instagram account of over 30,000 fans.

The tree became a tourist attraction and a host for various photography exhibitions during the time photographer Patrik Svedberg started documenting the broccoli tree.

But according to a heartless individual, the tree overstayed its welcome. Some loveless person sawed off one of the tree’s limbs and the tree suffered a tragic death.

“To share something is to risk losing it,” narrator Seth Radley notes in the tribute video. “You can’t unsaw a tree, but you can’t unsee one either.”

The broccoli tree may be gone, but its fame still lives on through calendars, prints, its nostalgic Instagram feed, and a website dedicated to its name.

What a harsh world for something that seemed so untouchable.

Categories
Architecture & Design Nature Science Travel

Photographer captures rare Devil Horns solar eclipse over the Persian Gulf

On December 26, 2019, amateur photographer Elias Chasiotis captured an incredible ‘red devil horns’ sunrise over the Persian Gulf during a rare solar eclipse. 

The Athens-based photographer was vacationing in the coastal city of Al Wakrah in Qatar just before the new year when he snapped the rare spectacle of the moon blocking the sun. The sun appears to rise in two pieces amid the cloudiness. 

“Astronomy has attracted me since I was a kid,” Chasiotis said in an interview with Bored Panda. “I’ve been an amateur astrophotographer for the last 15 years as well. I took these photos in the coastal city of Al Wakrah, Qatar, on the morning of December 26, 2019, when an annular eclipse was in progress.”

“I was worried that nothing would come out of the eclipse. However, when the sun finally began to rise, it looked like two separate pieces, some sort of red horns piercing the sea. It soon took the form of a crescent, with the so-called ‘Etruscan vase’ inferior mirage effect visible. Due to its shape, the phenomenon was nicknamed the ‘evil sunrise.’”

Interestingly, images of the red crescent sunrise emerged a few days before the assassination of Iranian General Qasem Soleimani. Make of that what you will.

See more of Chasiotis’s photos on Facebook.

Categories
Animals Nature

The cute and scary Venezuelan Poodle Moth

Some call it adorable. Others call it the devil. 

Brace yourself for the Venezuelan Poodle Moth, a fluffy one-inch insect that looks like a cross between a poodle and an alien. 

The tiny hard chitin scales that create the moth’s fluff help disguise it from bats while also keeping it warm.

Zoologist Dr. Arthur Anker captured the new species in the Gran Sabana region of Venezuela’s Canaima National Park in 2009. 

Poodle moth (Artace sp, perhaps A. cribaria), Venezuela

The poodle moth bears a strong resemblance to the Muslin Moth, a neotropical moth of the family Erebidae.

However, the internet continues to debate the reality of its existence due to the creature’s scarcity — not many others have identified the bizarre critter. 

The cute and scary Venezuelan Poodle Moth
Photo: Twitter/AnimalsWorld
The cute and scary Venezuelan Poodle Moth
Photo: Twitter/AnimalsWorld
The cute and scary Venezuelan Poodle Moth
Photo: Twitter/AnimalsWorld
The cute and scary Venezuelan Poodle Moth
Photo: Twitter/StrangeAnimals
Categories
Nature Travel

The incredible “Flying Lake” in the Faroe Islands

The beautiful Traelanipa cliffs on the island of Vagar in the Faroe Islands, Denmark, Europe is also known as the “Flying Lake.” It’s quite literally where the lake meets the ocean.

The raw landscape of the perpendicular rock wall jutting out from Sorvagsvatn Lake to the Atlantic Ocean is the type of scene that will take your breath away.

Traelanipa cliffs translate to “Slave Cliff” as the location used to be where Viking settlers would push enslaved women from Ireland and Scotland 465 feet down into the sea.

Categories
Nature Travel

Aerial views of the tulip fields of Lisse

The small Dutch town of Lisse is home to one of the most beautiful tulip fields in the world, the Keukenhof flower park.

More than 7 million flower bulbs are planted every year as part of the flower’s annual Tulips’ expo.

The spring flower garden features an assortment of vibrant colored tulips from deep shades like purple and maroon to pure white and yellow.

It’s truly a mesmerizing sight of color.

Aerial views of the tulip fields of Lisse
Photo: Twitter/LakesCancerPals
Aerial views of the tulip fields of Lisse
Photo: Twitter/DOverview
Aerial views of the tulip fields of Lisse
Photo: Twitter/Nature_lite
Aerial views of the tulip fields of Lisse
Photo: Twitter/MyBeauDes
Categories
Nature

Hyperion: The world’s tallest living tree

The Hyperion, located in the Redwood Park of Northern California, is the world’s tallest living tree. The tree stands at a height of 380.3 feet and is approximately 700-800 years old.

To put that in perspective, the tree is nearly 70 feet taller than the Statue of Liberty and 63 feet higher than Big Ben. Even the Ponderosa Pine cones are 15 inches long, according to one user who’s seen the redwood giants up close at Sequoia National Park.

Hyperion: The world's tallest living tree
via @kowalskijanpl/tw

Forestry researchers Chris Atkins and Michael Taylor discovered the redwood tree (Sequoia sempervirens) in 2006 — astonishing to think it took that long given the tree’s gigantic stature. However, the exact location is still a well-guarded secret.

The foliage is characteristic of that found in arid environments due to the plumbing challenges of drawing water up the tree.

The Paradox tree located in Redwood Humbolts Park is due to pass the Hyperion tree in height by the year 2031.

Interesting side note: the world’s largest complete fossilized tree (237 feet long) lies in Thailand.

Hyperion: The world's tallest living tree
Hyperion: The world's tallest living tree
Hyperion: The world's tallest living tree
Hyperion: The world's tallest living tree

Images above via the Famous Redwoods website which also contains a must-see a virtual tour of the tree.